Creatine Gummies vs. Creatine Powder: What is the difference?

Creatine Gummies vs. Creatine Powder: What is the difference?

Introduction 

Creatine is a popular supplement used to increase muscle mass, strength, and endurance as well as help with recovery. It is available in multiple forms including powder and the increasingly popular gummies.


Throughout this article, we cover the following to help you determine the best form of creatine for you:

  • What is creatine
  • The benefits of creatine
  • The different forms of creatine
  • The pros and cons of creatine gummies and creatine powders
  • How to choose the right form of creatine for you?

What is creatine? 

Creatine is a naturally occurring substance that helps your muscles produce energy during high-intensity exercise. It is found in foods such as meat and fish, and can also be taken as a supplement. Creatine works by increasing the amount of phosphocreatine in your muscles. Phosphocreatine is a high-energy molecule that can be quickly broken down to produce ATP, the body's main source of energy. When you take creatine supplements, your body stores more phosphocreatine, which allows you to produce more ATP during exercise. This can lead to improved strength, power, and muscle mass. Creatine is a safe and effective supplement for most people, but it is important to talk to your doctor before taking it.


The benefits of creatine

  • Increased muscle mass and strength: Creatine helps to increase muscle mass and strength by providing energy for muscle contractions. This can help athletes to lift heavier weights, perform more repetitions, and improve their overall performance.

  • Improved athletic performance: Creatine has been shown to improve athletic performance, particularly in short-burst activities such as sprinting and weightlifting. This is because creatine helps to provide energy for muscle contractions, which can lead to increased power and strength.

  • Faster recovery from exercise: Creatine can help to speed up the recovery process after exercise. This is because creatine helps to replenish the body's stores of phosphocreatine, which is a molecule that is used to produce energy for muscle contractions.

  • Reduced risk of muscle injuries: Creatine may help to reduce the risk of muscle injuries. This is because creatine helps to increase the body's ability to produce energy for muscle contractions. This can help to prevent muscle fatigue, which can lead to injuries.

  • Improved brain function: Creatine has been shown to improve brain function. This is because creatine helps to increase the production of brain cells and improve the communication between brain cells.

  • Increased lifespan: Creatine may help to increase lifespan. This is because creatine helps to protect cells from damage and improve the function of mitochondria, which are the cells' powerhouses.

What are the different forms of creatine?

There are many different forms of creatine available, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. The most common form of creatine is creatine monohydrate, which is a simple and effective form of creatine that is well-researched and affordable. Other forms of creatine include creatine ethyl ester, creatine hydrochloride, buffered creatine, and creatine malate. These forms of creatine are more expensive than creatine monohydrate.

The best form of creatine for you will depend on your individual needs and preferences. If you are looking for an affordable and effective form of creatine, creatine monohydrate is a good option.

 

What are the pros and cons of creatine gummies and creatine powders?

Creatine Powder

Creatine powder is the most common form of creatine. It is inexpensive and easy to find. To take creatine powder, you simply mix it with water or juice and drink it.

 

Creatine Gummies

Creatine gummies are a newer form of creatine that is becoming increasingly popular. They are more convenient than powder and can be taken on the go. To take creatine gummies, simply chew them like any other gummy.

 

Pros and Cons of Creatine Powder

Pros:

  • Inexpensive
  • Easy to find
  • Effective
  • Can be taken with food or on an empty stomach

Cons:

  • Can cause stomach upset
  • Can cause bloating
  • Can cause water retention
  • Not as convenient as gummies
  • Has a strong, unpleasant taste

 

Pros and Cons of Creatine Gummies

Pros:

  • Convenient
  • Easy to take
  • Less likely to cause stomach upset (as you don’t need to ‘load’ creatine gummies)
  • Less likely to cause bloating  (as you don’t need to ‘load’ creatine gummies)
  • Taste great
  • You don’t need to worry about this not dissolving like you do with the powders

Cons:

  • More expensive than powder
  • May not be available in all stores (thankfully you can get these through Gummo or Amazon)

How to choose the best creatine for you?

The best form of creatine for you will depend on your individual needs and preferences. For many individuals adding powder to their water everyday becomes a headache and with the powder not mixing very well it can leave you with an awful taste. If you are looking for an inexpensive and effective form of creatine, creatine powder is a good option. If you are looking for a more convenient form of creatine which tastes great and is easy to consume, creatine gummies will be best for you. The best form of creatine for you will depend on your individual needs and preferences. 

Tips for creatine

  • You don’t need to start with the loading phase, something a lot of gym goers mention. Loading creatine increases your chances of the inconvenient side effects which can ultimately put you off of them. As soon as you have taken your 3g,4g,5g for a month you’ll have the same benefits without the side effects.
  • Drink plenty of water. Creatine can cause dehydration, so it is important to drink plenty of water when taking creatine.
  • Monitor your progress. If you are not seeing any results after a few weeks, you may need to increase your intake of creatine or change the form of creatine you are taking. For many people over 50kg you’ll need more than 3g of creatine.

 Wanting to learn more around creatine? Visit our creatine blog or creatine FAQs

Sources:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263269

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4898252/

https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/treatments/17674-creatine